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Benner Family History The Benner Family originates in recent times in the Palinate region of Germany.

Around 1709 the Benner family joined the massive Palatine migration to the "new world". Some went to America, some to Canada. Many moved to other European countries. The New Zealand Benners are mainly descended from those that ended up in Ireland. This website is maintained by Gary Benner, who lives in Tauranga, New Zealand, and will provide a repository of family history for the Benner's and associated families.  
Maude Family History The Maude Family originates in England.

The Maude family has been traced back to the 1500's to John Staynland Maude, who lived in Kendal, Cumbria. The New Zealand Maudes are mainly descended from those that emigrated in the mid-1800's. This website is maintained by Gary Benner, who lives in Tauranga, New Zealand, and will provide a repository of family history for the Benners, Maudes, Fenwick, Ward, Kissling, Arlaud and associated families
Kissling Family History The Kissling Family originates in Germany.   The Kisslings in New Zealand are descended from George Adam Kissling and his wife Margaret Moxon who came to New Zealand in 1842 as missionaries. This website is maintained by Gary Benner, who lives in Tauranga, New Zealand, and will provide a repository of family history for the Benners, Kissling, and associated families.
Fenwick Family History The Fenwick Family originates in Hull, England. On branch headed by Charles Fenwick lived in Denmark and acted as diplomats. His sons moved to New Zealand and Australia.


Main Family Groups


Feature 1

New Zealand Benner, McClean, Hickson, Walter, Ball, Cawte

Emigrating from Ireland from 1874 onwards, they settled in the Bay of Plenty and elsewhere.

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Feature 2

Phillips, Hunt, Heron, Ford, Anglesey

Emigrating from Cornwall, William Henry Phillips Snr and Jnr spent time in Australia before moving to Nelson in New Zealand.

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Maude, Ward, Kissling, Kempthorne, Fenwick, Arlaud.

The Maude family dates back to England in 1066. Wards came across from Tasmania, and the Kisslings, Germany and Kempthornes, England. Fenwicks from Hull via Scandanavia. The Arlaud originates from Switzerland.

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George Adam Kissling

George Adam Kissling is our Great Great Great Grandfather, on my mother's side.


Also see the page on his wife Margaret Kissling (nee Moxon).


George Adam Kissling was born on the 2nd of April 1805, in a small town called Muhrr, Wurtemburg, in Germany.

His were not particularly well to do. His mother had lost four children and infancy (Magdalena [1807-1808], Gottlob [1808-1809], Catharina [1812-1814] and Christian [1817-1818]).  The other children were Johann [1810-1843], Frederich [1815-1840], Christian Karl [1819-], and Peter [1826-1882]. It appears Peter left for the USA and settled in Milwaukee.

Hi early career as a missionary was spent in Africa. His son John Kissling was born there in 1839.

That period is covered in this article: George Adam Kissling - From Germany to Africa


After leaving Africa for health reasons in 1841, George Adam returned to England with his family, and in 1842 in he left for New Zealand where he was stationed at Kawakawa (E.C.), which was afterwards named by the natives “Te Araroa” on account of the fact that he formed a long, box-edged path from his gate to his front door. His church, which would hold 500 worshippers, stood close to the beach.

That period is covered in this article: George Adam Kissling - New Zealand: Te Araroa

Becoming ill in February, 1846, Mr. Kissling went to Auckland. His doctor would not permit him to return to the East Coast. When his health was restored he took over the administration of the Maori work at Kohimarama, and became the minister of the Church of St. Barnabas. In 1852 he was appointed Archdeacon of Waitemata and placed in charge of St. Mary's, Parnell.

That period is covered in this article: George Adam Kissling - New Zealand: Auckland

He died on 10 November, 1865.

This portrait of George Adam was drawn ~1827 (aged ~22 yrs old) while he was in Basel, Switzerland, training with the Basel Missionary Society prior to leaving for Africa.



Arlaud Family

The Arlaud Family

pronounced "Arlo" with a long "o".

Arlaud MuseéOriginally a Swiss Family, our connection is via Mathilde Renee Arlaud, who was born in Denmark, and married ( 1849) George Fenwick, of English stock, who was then the Sardinian Consul in Denmark.

Maude English Pedigree

Maude Coat of ArmsThe Maude English Pedigree, in my line anyway, is reasonably well documented back to the early 16th Century.

Most people researching the Maude line feel that the family started with the arrival in England of a soldier named Monte Alto. He was a member of William the Conqueror's group and arrived in 1066 and participated in the Battle of Hastings. Thought to be an Italian mercenary (adventurer) living in Normandy, he deported himself well, and was rewarded with land holdings in what is now Yorkshire. These facts are documented in many places. The name was Anglicized to Montault, Monaut, and finally Maud or Maude.

Here is a document passed on to me by my Mother ( Renee), which charts the family from the birth of Bryan Maude (1634-1688), to my great grandfather Arthur Hay Maude (1837-1919).

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Cyril Fairfax Maude

Cyril MaudeCyril Fairfax Maude was born in Oamaru on the 20th June 1914, a little over a month prior to the declaration of World War I. He is my first cousin once removed.

His father was Henry Fairfax Maude (1881-1963) and mother Winifred Olga Jamieson (1886-1970).

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Who's Your Cousin Anyway?

Reference [Wikipedia]

A cousin is a relative with whom one shares a common ancestor. In modern usage, the term is rarely used when referring to a relative in one's own line of descent, or where there is a more specific term to describe the relationship: e.g., brother, sister, aunt, uncle. The term blood relative can be used synonymously, and underlines the existence of a genetic link. A system of degrees and removes is used to describe the relationship between the two cousins and the ancestor they have in common.

The degree (first, second, third cousin, et cetera) indicates one less than the minimum number of generations between both cousins and the nearest common ancestor. For example, a person with whom one shares a grandparent (but not a parent) is a first cousin; someone with whom one shares a great-grandparent (but not a grandparent) is a second cousin; and someone with whom one shares a great-great-grandparent (but not a great-grandparent) is a third cousin; and so on.

The remove (once removed, twice removed, etc.) indicates the number of generations, if any, separating the two cousins from each other. The child of one's first cousin is one's first cousin once removed because the one generation separation represents one remove. Oneself and the child are still considered first cousins, as one's grandparent (this child's great-grandparent), as the most recent common ancestor, represents one degree. Equally the child of one's great(also known as "grand")-aunt or uncle (who is one's parent's cousin) is one's first cousin once removed because their grandparent (one's own great-grandparent) is the most recent common ancestor.

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Interesting Stories

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More Families

This site also includes the history and connections with many other families who have inter-married with the main one's listed so far. These include:

Stace, Whitehead, Evershead, Henry, McDowell, Boyle, Fitzgerald, Roberts, Murray, Ordish, Magill, Pritchard, Eatwell, Hall, Alexander, Brooke, Tarry, Evans, Pursley, Robertson, Green, Cronsberry (Cronerberry) , Dolmage, Ruttle (Rucker), Paterson, Pasley, Benseman, Butler, Smyth, Spiers, Ford, Price, Doidge, McKie, Gifford, Mills, Hollier, Borck, Blowes, Henderson, Litchfield, Lodder, Lean, Kirkham, Angelsea, Chattock, Donald, Heron, Burdett, Warmington, Lock, Liggins, Wilson, Newman, Smith, Callaway, Werry, George, Phillipps, Blenkinsop, Arundel (Rundel), Inch, Hambley, Giddy, Windle, Walmsley, Wisnewski, Faulkner, McNeil, Gill, Otto, Wright, Scorgie, Scott, Burn, Long, Harrison, Thompson, Jackson, Tocker, Maddox, Wagner  .. and no doubt more to come.